May 13, 2019

OTTB Critique Presented by Athletux: Hugo Boss

By Mikaela Kantorowski - Athletux Equine
Hugo Boss (Artax x Goodie Good Girl), a 9-year-old off-the-track Thoroughbred. Photo courtesy of Mallory Stiver.

In this series, the United States Eventing Association (USEA) is partnering with Athletux to critique your off-the-track Thoroughbred (OTTB) eventing prospects. Professional riders and trainers will share their insights into each OTTB's pedigree, racing history, and conformation. Would you like to have your off-the-track Thoroughbred featured in the next edition of OTTB Critique presented by Athletux? We are looking for our next horse! Email your tips to [email protected].

Some off-the-track Thoroughbreds are just made for eventing. Mallory Stiver’s Hugo Boss aka “Huey” has proven to be just that. Huey is a 9-year-old 17 hand off-the-track Thoroughbred who raced under the name Andrus. Stiver explained, “He had a short but fairly successful race career, accumulating a little over $5,000 before his owners retired him sound and happy.” Stiver then adopted Huey as a 3-year-old a month after he last raced from the Oklahoma Thoroughbred Retirement Program, a hot spot for many future eventing stars.

"Huey" as a 3-year-old. Photo courtesy of Mallory Stiver.

There are programs like this in almost every state. Their main goal is to rehome OTTBs to loving homes and follow their progress as they excel in their new careers. If you’re looking for an OTTB, these various associations and nonprofits are where you should start looking.

Together, Stiver and Huey have gone up through levels competing at the CCI2-L and Intermediate level. When Stiver talks about Huey, she has nothing but pride and excitement for the potential he exudes and the boldness he shows on a daily basis. Stiver detailed, “I have lots of goals for his future and believe with his heart that he can go all the way up the levels. Cross-country is definitely his favorite phase. He is very bold and honest, and loves to do his job.”

Anne Peters Photo courtesy of Mallory Stiver.

However, it isn’t just about how amazing Huey is under saddle for Stiver. She added, “My favorite part about him is his quiet demeanor, kind eyes, and his amazing feet, especially for a Thoroughbred. He very rarely pulls shoes and has never had an abscess, knock on wood!” Stiver knows she has a star on her hands in Huey and she is thrilled to have him featured in this month’s OTTB Critique column.

This month we are excited to welcome Natalia Neneman to critique this special OTTB. Neneman is no stranger to OTTBs. She has ridden up through the upper echelon of the sport on OTTBs she has brought up the levels herself and recently won the fox hunting class at the Retired Racehorse Project's Thoroughbred Makeover. She knows what it takes to succeed in the sport and has an unbelievable eye, spotting diamonds in the rough from across the track.

Photo courtesy of Mallory Stiver.

First, Neneman commented on how pleasant, gentle, and genuine Huey looks. Moving on to his conformation, Neneman pointed out, “He has a nice big shoulder and, although he looks to be a touch short coupled, it can be hard to tell from a photo.” She also added that he “looks to be uphill and has a kind eye as well, something I look for in every horse.” His conformation already points to the horse being perfectly suited for his new career.

Then, Neneman moves through her checklist and moves on to his under saddle photos. Right from the beginning, she noticed, “It really looks like he enjoys his job and he always has his ears up!” Neneman also really appreciated the effort Huey makes over the fences and his expression under saddle as well. “He looks to have all the scope in the world and his jump will allow him to excel in the sport because of the way he uses his body and strength in a way that is economical and efficient,” she explained. “You can try to teach a horse how to jump like this but it definitely helps when from the moment you bring them off the track they know exactly where to put their legs. This horse looks to be a super jumper,” she further added.

Photo courtesy of Mallory Stiver.

Overall, Neneman has a great feeling about this pair as she feels he has all the makings of the OTTBs that succeed at the highest levels of the sport. His positive conformation traits combined with his athletic ability and scope all point to a long and successful eventing career. There is nothing Neneman loves more than watching an OTTB blossom and she feels so much pride knowing others are appreciating them just as much as she does. This horse is a perfect example of the classic OTTB and she wishes Stiver all the best with her talented partner!

Jun 02, 2020 Education

Daniel Stewart's Tip of the Month: Your Ego is not Your Amigo

This month we’re going to begin a several-month series about defense and coping mechanisms. It’s common for these two terms to be used interchangeably, but they’re actually quite different. Coping mechanisms are mental strategies that resolve stressful events, while defense mechanisms are behaviors that attempt to avoid or hide from them.

Jun 01, 2020 Association News

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While every story submitted to the USEA for the June Horse of the Month was unique and special, it was Teddy’s story that stood out. Therefore, the USEA June Horse of the Month is Talon Ted aka "Teddy", a 14.1 hand, 17-year-old Paint Pinto Gelding owned by Eran Murray and ridden by Eran’s daughter, Brooke Murray.

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Event Cancellations and Responses to Coronavirus (COVID-19)

This article will be updated to include statements as they are released from upcoming USEA recognized events regarding actions they are taking due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

May 31, 2020 Grants

Apply Now for the 2021 Worth the Trust Scholarship

In 2000 and with the support of Joan Iversen Goswell, the Worth the Trust Scholarships were established to provide financial assistance to amateurs to pursue their education in eventing. The funds from the Worth the Trust Educational Scholarship may be used for training opportunities such as clinics, working student positions, and private or group instruction, or to learn from an official, course designer, technical delegate, judge, veterinarian, or organizer.

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