Sep 17, 2019

The Thoroughbreds of #AEC2019

By Claire Kelley - USEA Staff
The Advanced division T.I.P. winners, Cecelia (left) and Creative Dreamer (right). USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

The Thoroughbreds came out in full force at the 2019 USEA American Eventing Championships (AEC) presented by Nutrena Feeds. In a state that’s known for the sport of horse racing, there were over 193 T.I.P. registered Thoroughbreds that competed at the Kentucky Horse Park for the 2019 AEC. As these hot-blooded horses galloped across the bluegrass and jumped under the lights, they were recognized by The Jockey Club’s Thoroughbred Incentive Program (T.I.P.). The Jockey Club created T.I.P. to encourage the retraining of Thoroughbreds into other disciplines upon completion of careers in racing or breeding. Kristin Werner, senior counsel of The Jockey Club awarded a T.I.P. Champion and T.I.P Reserve Champion in every AEC division at every level this year.

$60,000 Adequan USEA Advanced Final T.I.P. Awards

  • T.I.P. Champion: Ceceila ridden by Daniela Moguel, 61.0
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Creative Dreamer ridden by Caitlin Henderson, 73.2
Daniela Moguel and Cecelia, Advanced T.I.P. Champions. KTB Creative Group Photo.

In the $60,000 Adequan USEA Advanced Final, the T.I.P. Champion was Cecelia (Connecticut x Penny Stock) a 16-year-old Thoroughbred mare owned by Jorge Martinez and Paloma Garcia and ridden by Daniela Moguel. The T.I.P. Reserve Champion was Creative Dreamer (Creative x Banic) a 14-year-old Thoroughbred gelding ridden and owned by Catherine Henderson.

Intermediate T.I.P. Awards

  • T.I.P. Champion: Military Mind ridden by Whitney Mahloch, 45.5
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Shakedown Street ridden by Melanie Smith, 47.6
Whitney Maloch and Military Mind, Intermediate T.I.P. Champions. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

The largest division in the 2019 AEC was the Intermediate division with 65 starters. The T.I.P. Champion was awarded to Military Mind (Military x Smart Balance) a 13-year-old Thoroughbred gelding ridden and owned by Whitney Mahloch. The T.I.P. Reserve Champion was Shakedown Street (Survivalist x My Dear Rose) a 9-year-old Thoroughbred gelding ridden and owned by Melanie Smith.

Preliminary T.I.P. Awards

Bates Preliminary Horse

  • T.I.P. Champion: Stoneman ridden by Jennifer McFall, 30.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Ermintrude ridden by Daisy Trayford, 35.8

Bates Junior/Young Rider Preliminary

  • T.I.P. Champion: Dandy Longlegs ridden by Kelsey Ann Quinn, 38.9

Bates Preliminary Rider

  • T.I.P. Champion: Fairway King ridden by Lauren Turner, 43.5
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Flying Again ridden by Lauren Turner, 45.4

Bates Preliminary Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: Mr. Barron ridden by Wisti Nelson, 54.6
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Prince of Power ridden by Katherine Nolan, 66.6
Jennifer McFall and Stoneman. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Stoneman (Grindstone x Smiler), who’s described as the “best little Thoroughbred in the land,” from Jennifer McFall on her Facebook page, was the T.I.P Champion of the Bates Preliminary Horse division. Owned by Cheron Laboissonniere, the 8-year-old Thoroughbred gelding and Jennifer McFall finished on a score of 30.8 to place fifth overall out of 55 starters. The ‘best little Thoroughbred’ was also the best scoring T.I.P. horse out of all the Preliminary divisions.

The T.I.P. Reserve Champion of the Bates Preliminary Horse division was awarded to the 6-year-old Thoroughbred mare, Ermintrude (First Dude x UK) ridden and owned by Daisy Trayford.

Lauren Turner won the Preliminary Rider T.I.P. Champion on Fairway King and T.I.P. Reserve Champion on Flying Again. KTB Creative Group Photo.

Modified/Training and Training T.I.P. Awards

Equistro Modified/Training

  • T.I.P. Champion: All of Indy ridden by Tawn Edwards, 42.9
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: One Sly Fox ridden by Kirsten Schuitema, 43.3

Training Horse

  • T.I.P. Champion: Point Nemo ridden by Ryan Keefe, 35.5
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Milo Diamon ridden by Daisy Trayford, 38.6

Junior Training

  • T.I.P. Champion: Woodstock’s Little Nev ridden by Abigail Mazzatta, 28.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Born Ready ridden by Cassie Sanger, 29.1

Training Rider

  • T.I.P. Champion: Sir Rockstar ridden by Erin Jarboe, 43.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Say So Slew ridden by Lisa Davidson, 46.0

Training Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: Snowflake Lane ridden by Rebecca Hunt, 29.0
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Toga ridden by Sheri Thornley, 34.4
Abigail Mazzatta and Woodstock’s Little Nev. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Two embroidered show coolers, hundreds of dollars in prize money, a custom Stackhouse saddle, a Charles Owen helmet, a French stall plaque, a $500 Mountain Horse gift card, and much more – Abigail Mazzatta won a heap of prizes with the 12-year-old Thoroughbred gelding Woodstock’s Little Nev (Luftikus x One Lucky One), owned by Samantha Lendl. Finishing on their dressage score of 28.8, Mazzatta and Woodstock’s Little Nev won the Junior Training division and were the Junior Training T.I.P. Champions as well.

Mazzatta got the ride on Woodstock’s Little Nev from Jennie Brannigan. “[Jennie and his owner, Samantha Lendl,] were so nice to lend me him for my lease that I have with him. They have done such an amazing job with him; it’s incredible. It’s an honor to ride such a wonderful horse. He is just the best!”

Cassie Sanger and Born Ready. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Only 0.3 penalties behind the division Champion was Cassie Sanger and her Thoroughbred gelding, Born Ready (From Down Town x Jilly’s Red Sixty Six) who finished second in the Training Junior division and were the Junior Training T.I.P. Reserve Champions. Sanger acquired the 10-year-old Thoroughbred gelding from Waylon Roberts about a year ago. “He is still kind of new to me; it’s our first competition season. He is such a sweet horse. We are moving up to Preliminary in two weeks, so that should be fun.”

Out of 42 starters, it was the Thoroughbreds that dominated the Junior Training division by claiming the top two spots.

Rebecca Hunt and Snowflake Lane. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

“She’s worth her weight in gold,” said Rebecca Hunt of her own 7-year-old Thoroughbred mare, Snowflake Lane (Dunkirk x Correoso). “She’s very sweet, one of the sweetest mares I’ve ever had.” The pair jumped double clear to finish second on a 29.0 in the Training Amateur division and were the Training Amateur T.I.P. Champions. The Training Amateur T.I.P. Reserve Champion was awarded to Toga ridden by Sheri Thronley.

Novice T.I.P. Awards

Novice Horse

  • T.I.P. Champion: Perpetual Optimism ridden by Nuno Santos, 36.6
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: SS Palantir ridden by Jennifer Coleman, 37.0

Junior Novice

  • T.I.P. Champion: Silver Bop ridden by Kate Thresher, 31.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Codename Toby ridden by Stephanie Cordell, 34.0

Junior Novice 15 and Under

  • T.I.P. Champion: Limited Access ridden by Reagan McIntosh, 34.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Dee Ron ridden by Gracelyn Mogelnicki, 35.1

Novice Rider

  • T.I.P. Champion: B.E. Isabella ridden by Elena Perea, 30.1
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Ventry ridden by Liz Shroeder, 34.6

Novice Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: KD Mac ridden by Shannon Allen, 34.4
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Magic Mike ridden by Paige Thompson, 35.1

Novice Master Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: Halloway ridden by Cindi Moravec, 30.6
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Land of Jewels ridden by Melissa McNally, 32.5
Kate Thresher and Silver Bop. KTB Creative Group Photo.

The sky was dark, the lights were bright, and the crowd was big as the last ten Junior Novice riders took center stage in the Rolex Stadium on Saturday night. “It was incredible,” said Kate Thresher on her experience jumping under the Rolex Stadium lights.

The finale of the Junior Novice division was pushed back several hours due to a lightning delay which resulted in a finish not to be forgotten. The T.I.P. Thoroughbred, Silver Bop (Bop x Silver Concern) and Thresher were the only pair in the top 10 to leave all the rails in the cups and took home the win on a 31.8. “[My horse] was amazing,” Thresher said of her 7-year-old Thoroughbred gelding. “He listened every step of the moment and I just couldn’t be prouder of him.”'

Stephanie Cordell and Codename Toby. KTB Creative Group Photo.

The T.I.P. Reserve Champion of the Junior Novice division was awarded to the 15-year-old Thoroughbred gelding Codename Toby (Treasure Cove x Go Bubby Bo), owned by Amanda Tamminga and ridden by Stephanie Cordell. They too got to experience the Saturday night lights as they finished third overall in the Junior Novice division. “My ride was awesome. I couldn’t be more proud of him. He has brought me along so much. I am just so happy to be here,” said Cordell.

Beginner Novice T.I.P. Awards

Beginner Novice Horse

  • T.I.P. Champion: Sock Monkey ridden by Katarzyna Jachymczyk, 36.1
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Perfect Acquisition ridden by Hannah Warner, 37.1

Junior Beginner Novice

  • T.I.P. Champion: Tekkenistic ridden by Payton Myers, 31.9
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Oliver Twist ridden by Aline O’Rourke, 34.0

Junior Beginner Novice 14 and Under

  • T.I.P. Champion: Chambery ridden by Sierra Thomas, 32.9
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Inanewyorkminute ridden by Catherine Frank, 35.9

Beginner Novice Rider

  • T.I.P. Champion: Remastered ridden by Beth Allen, 32.4
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Concatulations ridden by Catherine Wunderlich, 33.5

Beginner Novice Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: Whatinsamhill ridden by Kirsten LaVassar, 30.6
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Weight of the World ridden by Jessica Wymbs, 35.5

Beginner Novice Master Amateur

  • T.I.P. Champion: Look Cody Look ridden by Letha Calvin, 34.8
  • T.I.P. Reserve Champion: Great Moments ridden by Julie Cayer, 37.5
Kirsten LaVassar and Whatinsamhill on cross-country. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

“I absolutely love him,’ said Kirsten LaVassar when describing Whatinsamhill, a 10-year-old Thoroughbred gelding owned by Jocelyn Deschene. The pair finished second overall in the Beginner Novice Amateur division and were the Beginner Novice Amateur T.I.P. Champions.

“I really believe in the partnership I have with this horse. When I found out that we were both qualified to go, I just felt that there’s no way I couldn’t enjoy myself and have a good time. It has been the best experience [and] I’m so glad we did it,” said LaVassar.

The Beginner Novice Amateur T.I.P. Reserve Champion was awarded to Weight of the World, a 10-year-old Thoroughbred gelding ridden and owned by Jessica Wymbs.

Beginner Novice Master Amateur T.I.P. Champion, Whatinsamhill (left), and T.I.P Reserve Champion, Weight of the World (left). KTB Creative Group Photo.

Click here to register a Thoroughbred through the T.I.P. program. Click here to look up a T.I.P. number. Make sure the show organizer is aware of a horse’s T.I.P. number before the start of every competition.

The USEA would like to congratulate all the Thoroughbreds of the 2019 AEC!

About The Jockey Club Thoroughbred Incentive Program

The Thoroughbred Incentive Program was created to encourage the retraining of Thoroughbreds into other disciplines upon completion of careers in racing or breeding, T.I.P. offers incentives for competition horses, recreational horses, young riders and Thoroughbreds in a non-competitive second career as well as a Championship horse show.

For more information, please visit tjctip.com.

About the USEA American Eventing Championships

The USEA American Eventing Championships (AEC) presented by Nutrena Feeds is the pinnacle of the sport for the national levels. Held annually, the best junior, adult amateur, and professional competitors gather to vie for national championship titles at every level from Beginner Novice to Advanced. This ultimate test of horse and rider draws hundreds of horses and riders from around the country to compete for fabulous prizes, a piece of the substantial prize money, and the chance to be named the National Champion at their respective levels. The 2020 AEC will be held August 25-30, 2020 at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky. Click here to learn more about the USEA American Eventing Championships.

The USEA would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of the AEC: Presenting Sponsor: Nutrena; Advanced Final Title Sponsor: Adequan; Platinum Level Sponsors: Bates Saddles, Equistro; Gold Level Sponsors: Charles Owen, Standlee Hay, Parker Equine Insurance; Silver Level Sponsors: Mountain Horse; The Jockey Club, Park Equine; Bronze Level Sponsors: Arnall’s Naturals, State Line Tack, Black Petticoat, Devoucoux, Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation, Horseware Ireland, LandSafe SmartPak, Dubarry, The Chronicle of the Horse, Stackhouse and Ellis Saddles, Auburn Laboratories, FITS Riding, Ovation, Lanier Sand and Soil, Event Cooling Solutions, Farm House Tack; Contributing Level Sponsors: Ariat, Meanwhile Back on the Farm, L.V. Harkness, Lexmark, GLC Direct, Georgetown Tourism, FarmVet, FLAIR Nasal Strips, Nunn Finer, RevitaVet, Resvantage Equine, CrossCountry App; Prize Level Sponsors: GumBits, Ride Heels Down, C4 Belts, I Love My Horse, Mare Modern Goods, Bluegrass Vibershield, Bluegrass Animal Products, Caracol, Active Interest Media, Astrid’s Oil, Baekgaard, On The Bit Horse Supplies, Luxe EQ, EQ AM Magazine, Jetti Spa, Great British Equinery, Foxden Equine, The Scoring Chix, Pure Form Equine; Competitor’s Party Sponsors:Jacqueline Mars, Kat and Roberto Cuca, United States Hunter Jumper Association, and United States Dressage Federation.

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