Aug 09, 2018

The Road to AEC: Learning Together

Caitlyn and Tess show jumping at Otter Creek Horse Trials in 2017. Photo courtesy of Caitlyn Ruud.

Top Gun Tess or "Tess" is a 15.1 hand Quarter Horse mare. She is 13 years old and I bought her five years ago when I had just started riding. I bought Tess from a western barn in Illinois and she was just supposed to be my first horse to learn to ride on. All she knew was western and had never seen a jump before in her life. After a couple months of riding her, my trainer Lizzy Jahnke said she would teach her how to jump. It was a long process as we were learning together. My coach was super patient and after lots of trying and even with many refusals, Tess started to get the hang of it.

After about a year of owning her, she started acting naughty. She would scoot after jumps and throw huge bucks that got me off easily as a new rider. I lost count how many times she bucked me off, and I started to lose some confidence. We had the vet out and after ultrasounding her back found out that she had some holes along the supraspinous ligament of her back. We began the process of rest and rehab, starting with a lot of ground work. That is when I feel like our relationship really took a turn. I was out at the barn every day hand walking and doing her stretches and when it was time for her to come back to work, I was honestly a little worried. I didn’t know what she was going to be like having been off for four months.

Caitlyn and Tess at one of their very first schooling shows in 2015. Photo courtesy of Caitlyn Ruud.

When I did get back in the saddle, it felt like I was riding a totally different horse. Our relationship had made a world of difference in her behavior and her attitude. It was a long and slow process getting her back from rehab starting with two minutes of trot and working our way up to eventually being able to canter. After a couple months of increased trot and canter work, she was finally ready to jump again.

It is amazing how a relationship with a horse can make such an incredible difference in their work ethic. She seemed to trust me so much more and seemed a lot more willing to work for me. Last year we did our first season competing together at Beginner Novice and she has been a superstar.

She qualified last year for the AEC and I took her just for fun. She ended up being really reliable the entire weekend and placed seventh in the Beginner Novice Horse division, which I was so proud of. I cant wait to compete her again this year! I feel a very special connection to her because we learned to jump together (through lots of times being jumped out of the tack!) She is my first horse and has taught me so much about how important it is to develop that special bond with your horse. That relationship takes time and effort to build but is definitely worth it. She’s gone from a western pleasure horse to my little Beginner Novice champion and I’m so proud of her!

Jun 02, 2020 Education

Daniel Stewart's Tip of the Month: Your Ego is not Your Amigo

This month we’re going to begin a several-month series about defense and coping mechanisms. It’s common for these two terms to be used interchangeably, but they’re actually quite different. Coping mechanisms are mental strategies that resolve stressful events, while defense mechanisms are behaviors that attempt to avoid or hide from them.

Jun 01, 2020 Association News

USEA Horse of the Month: Talon Ted

While every story submitted to the USEA for the June Horse of the Month was unique and special, it was Teddy’s story that stood out. Therefore, the USEA June Horse of the Month is Talon Ted aka "Teddy", a 14.1 hand, 17-year-old Paint Pinto Gelding owned by Eran Murray and ridden by Eran’s daughter, Brooke Murray.

Jun 01, 2020 Eventing News

Event Cancellations and Responses to Coronavirus (COVID-19)

This article will be updated to include statements as they are released from upcoming USEA recognized events regarding actions they are taking due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

May 31, 2020 Grants

Apply Now for the 2021 Worth the Trust Scholarship

In 2000 and with the support of Joan Iversen Goswell, the Worth the Trust Scholarships were established to provide financial assistance to amateurs to pursue their education in eventing. The funds from the Worth the Trust Educational Scholarship may be used for training opportunities such as clinics, working student positions, and private or group instruction, or to learn from an official, course designer, technical delegate, judge, veterinarian, or organizer.

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