Sep 16, 2020

The Rider Experience with EMS

Dawn Robbins and Diablo Tejano at the 2018 USEA American Eventing Championships. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

Dawn Robbins is a current USEA Board of Governors member, Area VI adult rider, and a contributor to the development of the Event Management System (EMS). Note that this article was written more than a year ago and serves as a guide for future USEA software development. The ‘guts’ of this complex system for organizing and scoring events – the Event Management System is in development and a great deal of work has already been done. Show organizers and secretaries will interact with the EMS, while riders, owners, trainers, and spectators will interact with the free USEA Event Companion App on their smart devices – all tied to the same accurate and complete show information. Updates to the USEA Event Companion App are also in development but will not be complete until later in 2021. This article is to provide a vision of how EMS could change the competition experience in the future.

On my way to the barn in the morning, I receive an alert on my phone that the closing date for the Galway Downs May Horse Trials is today. At the barn, I open my USEA Event Companion App and log in. I enter the show, choosing one of my available horses, and I decide on the Preliminary Rider division once the app confirms my qualifications. I pay with my credit card, stored within my phone, order stabling, enter my preference of barns and stalls after the app shows me a map of the available barn locations, and I order shavings and an RV spot. I request that a receipt be texted to me, and I’m all set!

In the days leading up to the show, I decide to change my division. I open the app and make that change. Later, I receive a series of alerts. One is my time schedule with a division confirmation, and another is a stall number confirmation. I check on the app to find a map of the barns, competitor entrances, gate codes, wash racks, and show office location. As the weather reports become available, it appears that the temperatures will be high. I get an alert that the schedule has changed and I’ll be running cross-country an hour earlier in the morning. I log in to check that my friends are stabled near me and to see what time they run. I decide to ‘follow’ them throughout the weekend so that I’ll get their scores sent to me automatically, along with my own.

At the show, I perform my dressage test. Within a short time, I receive an alert that my score is ready to view. I check on my phone, and I see all of my individual movement scores, the judge’s comments, and my overall score. I forward the information to my trainer and my boyfriend. For the friends that I’m following, I start receiving alerts of their ride times and arena locations. I also realize that I’m going to need more shavings, so I order two more bales via the app. I get a confirmation that they’ll be there by 3:00 p.m. today. I also order a second ticket for the competitor party and get a receipt and confirmation.

The next day, I receive an alert as I’m getting ready for cross-country that there is a hold on course, and then I receive a second alert saying that my time has been delayed by 30 minutes. Once I’m done riding, I receive alerts that the scores are posted, including scores on each cross-country jump and my time. I can check the app and see how I’m doing overall, and I receive alerts if a score has been changed and re-posted.

The rest of the weekend goes great and I get an alert that the ribbons for my division are ready for pickup. Later, I receive an invoice for my charges, which I accept to close out my account. I get a receipt sent to me and a nice message from the show organizer, thanking me for coming to the event. The next day, I receive a notification from the USEA that my score has qualified me for the USEA American Eventing Championships and directing me to more information about attending.

About the Event Management System

The future of three-day eventing is in the new Event Management System (EMS). This new software system will allow for competitors, coaches, organizers, and secretaries to have relevant event information in their hands. By using advanced technology, this new software system will be an all-encompassing tool used to provide a well-organized, smooth competition with limited contact and instant updates.

For more information on EMS, please read What is EMS, the EMS Frequently Asked Questions, or contact [email protected].

Sep 30, 2022 Convention

Registration is Now Open for the 2022 USEA Annual Meeting & Convention in Savannah, Georgia!

Attention USEA members! Registration for the 2022 USEA Annual Meeting & Convention is now open! The convention will be held in person on December 7-11, 2022 at the Hyatt Regency Savannah Hotel in Savannah, Georgia.

Sep 30, 2022 News

USEA Names Athletes for Inaugural EA21 National Camp

The United States Eventing Association (USEA) is proud to announce the selected Young Rider athletes for the Emerging Athletes 21 Program (EA21) national camp, now that the EA21 regional clinics have concluded. Twelve riders were accepted into each of the five regional EA21 clinics, taught by USEA Eventing Coaches Program (ECP) instructors, and now riders have been selected from the regional clinics to participate in the inaugural EA21 national camp this winter.

Sep 29, 2022 Instructors

The Eventing Coaches Program: Phyllis Dawson on Training Horses and Riders

Ninety percent of training a horse is getting the horse to understand exactly what you want them to do. In general, horses are generous and willing creatures who want to please us; very seldom do they behave badly on purpose. Horses don’t come out and say, ‘Let’s make Mom’s (or Dad’s) life miserable today by going as poorly as possible - most prefer to do the right thing, as long as they know what that is.

Sep 28, 2022 Education

A Veterinarian’s Tips for Maximizing Longevity and Soundness

Regardless of the level at which a horse is competing, its veterinary team is at the forefront of most decisions regarding its career and well-being. Liz Arbittier, VMD, CVA, has been working with equine athletes for over two decades. Graduating from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) in 2001, she worked in private practice with a focus on sports medicine and pre-purchase exams until joining Penn Vet’s New Bolton Center Field Service team in 2013. Situated in the heart of Area II’s eventing scene, the team provides ambulatory services to the surrounding area, which is home to multiple Olympians.

Official Corporate Sponsors of the USEA

Official Joint Therapy Treatment of the USEA

Official Feed of the USEA

Official Saddle of the USEA

Official Real Estate Partner of the USEA

Official Equine Insurance of the USEA

Official Forage of the USEA

Official Supplement Feeding System of the USEA

Official Outerwear of the USEA

Official Competition & Training Apparel of the USEA