Jun 01, 2021

Rule Refresher: Rule Changes Taking Effect June 1st

USEA/Kim Beaudoin Photo

Three rules previously reported by the USEA and discussed through online USEA webinars will take effect on June 1, 2021. Each rule was approved by the USEF Board of Directors during their May 10th meeting. These rule changes focus on the reduction in risk in eventing.

The first rule change recognizes that licensed cross-country course designers by the nature of their training and licensing are qualified to identify dangerous riding. This rule will enable those designers to have the authority to stop a rider on course for dangerous riding.

Changes to the rules are shown below in bold italics.

EV112 Dangerous Riding

4. The Ground Jury, and the Technical Delegate, and the Course Designer, when present solely in his/her role as a course designer, have the authority to stop a rider on the cross-country course for dangerous riding, riding an exhausted horse, excessive pressing of a tired horse, riding an obviously lame horse, excessive use of the whip and/or spurs or riding in an unsafe way.

The additional two rule changes are directly related. In reviewing the incidence of poor riding at competitions, competition data, and other information the USEA views it as important to highlight that poor show jumping performance should result in retirement. British Eventing instituted a similar rule several years ago and this will be an additional measure to lessen risk in the sport and encourage a culture of good horsemanship.

EV153 Faults

4. Faults are penalized in penalty points or by elimination as set out in this section (EV153).

20 or more (show jump) penalties at Training, Modified, Preliminary, Intermediate, or Advanced

Compulsory Retirement enforced at end of show jump round unless competitor retires or is eliminated

(and)

EV150.1 Penalties

g. 20 show jump penalties (150.10)

10 Compulsory Retirement. A competitor incurs 20 or more show jumping penalties at the training level or higher. Enforced at the end of the round unless the competitor retires or is eliminated.

Want to catch up on past rule refreshers? Click here.

Jun 19, 2021 Editorial

Crossing Oceans with U.S. Olympian Tiana Coudray

Plenty of event riders have chosen to cross oceans and base themselves thousands of miles away from “home” in pursuit of their career dreams - look at the likes of New Zealanders Sir Mark Todd and Andrew Nicholson, and now Tim and Jonelle Price, while Andrew Hoy, Clayton Fredericks and of course Boyd Martin and Phillip Dutton have set sail from Australian shores. Not many American riders do it, though, probably because the sport is big enough and competitive enough in the U.S. not to make it necessary.

Jun 18, 2021

Weekend Quick Links: June 18-20, 2021

Are you following along with the action from home this weekend? Or maybe you're competing at an event and need information fast. Either way, we’ve got you covered! Check out the USEA’s Weekend Quick Links for links to information including the prize list, ride times, live scores, and more for all the events running this weekend.

Jun 18, 2021 Grants

Ever So Sweet Scholarship Recipient Announced: Inaugural Scholarship Awarded to Helen Casteel

Strides for Equality Equestrians and the United States Eventing Association Foundation are proud to announce the first recipient of the Ever So Sweet Scholarship. The scholarship, which is the first of its kind, provides a fully-funded opportunity for riders from diverse backgrounds to train with upper-level professionals. Helen Casteel of Maryland is the first recipient of the bi-annual scholarship.

Jun 18, 2021 Association News

USEA Office Closed in Observance of Juneteenth

Tomorrow is Juneteenth, which marks the day in 1865 when the federal order was read in Galveston, Texas stating that all enslaved people in Texas were free. This federal order was critical because it represented the emancipation of the last remaining enslaved African Americans in the Confederate States. Although Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed all people enslaved in the Confederacy almost two and a half years earlier, Union enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent, especially in Texas. Slavery would continue in two states that had remained in the Union— Kentucky and Delaware — until the ratification of the 13th Amendment in December 1865.

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