Jun 04, 2021

Are You Interested in Joining a USEA Committee? Here's How!

USEA/Jessica Duffy Photo.

Are you interested in joining a committee for the USEA? The first step is to understand what role a committee plays in the USEA how decisions are made.

Committees make up one of the three main groups that support the USEA, along with task forces and the Board of Governors (BOG). Every committee reports to one BOG member, who ultimately makes the final decisions. Currently, there are 26 committees with anywhere from five to 25 members on each. These committees work together to come up with decisions involving handbooks, volunteers, scoring systems, and several other important factors.

Now that we know more information about the committees, the next step in joining one is to get involved in your local Area. Volunteers leaders are crucial and needed at the local level in Areas. Working and getting engaged locally is a great way to be appointed to a national committee. The best and easiest way to do this is to contact your local USEA Area.

Additionally, you can reach out to USEA Committee Chair members, or the Staff Liaison to the national committee, and discuss your interest in helping. People are added or approved to committees when spots become available or if additional help is needed. Both the USEA President, Max Corcoran, and the Board of Governors approve every committee member. Although this process is not always instant, people are often approved in a timely manner.

Committees and the members behind them are an integral part of the USEA. From small details to large decisions, USEA committees are there to come up with the best solution possible. Making connections within the USEA and your local Area is one of the best ways to get involved and have the possibility of joining a committee.

Useful Resources:

Click here to view Contacts for Local USEA Areas.

Click here to view the current Committee List.

Click here to view a contact list for USEA Staff.






Jun 19, 2021 Editorial

Crossing Oceans with U.S. Olympian Tiana Coudray

Plenty of event riders have chosen to cross oceans and base themselves thousands of miles away from “home” in pursuit of their career dreams - look at the likes of New Zealanders Sir Mark Todd and Andrew Nicholson, and now Tim and Jonelle Price, while Andrew Hoy, Clayton Fredericks and of course Boyd Martin and Phillip Dutton have set sail from Australian shores. Not many American riders do it, though, probably because the sport is big enough and competitive enough in the U.S. not to make it necessary.

Jun 18, 2021

Weekend Quick Links: June 18-20, 2021

Are you following along with the action from home this weekend? Or maybe you're competing at an event and need information fast. Either way, we’ve got you covered! Check out the USEA’s Weekend Quick Links for links to information including the prize list, ride times, live scores, and more for all the events running this weekend.

Jun 18, 2021 Grants

Ever So Sweet Scholarship Recipient Announced: Inaugural Scholarship Awarded to Helen Casteel

Strides for Equality Equestrians and the United States Eventing Association Foundation are proud to announce the first recipient of the Ever So Sweet Scholarship. The scholarship, which is the first of its kind, provides a fully-funded opportunity for riders from diverse backgrounds to train with upper-level professionals. Helen Casteel of Maryland is the first recipient of the bi-annual scholarship.

Jun 18, 2021 Association News

USEA Office Closed in Observance of Juneteenth

Tomorrow is Juneteenth, which marks the day in 1865 when the federal order was read in Galveston, Texas stating that all enslaved people in Texas were free. This federal order was critical because it represented the emancipation of the last remaining enslaved African Americans in the Confederate States. Although Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed all people enslaved in the Confederacy almost two and a half years earlier, Union enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent, especially in Texas. Slavery would continue in two states that had remained in the Union— Kentucky and Delaware — until the ratification of the 13th Amendment in December 1865.

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