Feb 18, 2021

VIDEO: Future Event Horse Judging

By USEA
Judges Chris Ryan and Peter Gray evaluating a horse at the 2019 USEA Future Event Horse East Coast Championships. USEA/Jessica Duffy Photo.

In lieu of the USEA Educational Symposium, which could not be held this year due to COVID-19, this week we are bringing you educational content from the USEA Instructors' Certification Program, the USEA Young Event Horse program, and the USEA Future Event Horse program.

Want to learn the difference between a ‘flashy mover’ and ‘correct mover’? Or which conformation flaws inhibit an event horse’s performance? USEA Future Event Horse (FEH) Committee Co-Chairs Robin Walker and Susan Graham White along with 2019 USEA FEH Championship judges Chris Ryan and Peter Gray share a look into FEH judging in this educational video.

These four experts thoroughly discuss what makes a good event horse. For conformation, they discuss what judges should look for, what good conformation looks like, and what conformation flaws could hinder an event horse’s performance. For assessment of gaits, Gray explains the top characteristics that he looks for, Graham White explains correct movement, and Ryan explains how conformation can affect movement. Graham White and Walker also go through a step-by-step explanation of how to judge a FEH competition.

Two videos on the handling of Future Event Horses for competition are also available here.

About the USEA Future Event Horse Program

The USEA introduced the Future Event Horse Program in 2007 in response to the popularity of the already established USEA Young Event Horse Program. Where the YEH program assesses 4- and 5-year-old prospective event horses based on their performance, the FEH program evaluates yearlings, 2-year-olds, 3-year-olds, and 4-year-olds for their potential for the sport based on conformation and type. Yearlings, 2-year-olds, and 3-year-olds are presented in-hand while 4-year-olds are presented under saddle at the walk, trot, and canter before being stripped of their tack and evaluated on their conformation. Divisions are separated by year and gender. At the Championships, 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds are also required to demonstrate their potential over fences in an additional free-jump division. Click here to learn more about the Future Event Horse Program.

The USEA would like to thank Bates Saddles, Parker Equine Insurance, SmartPak, Standlee Hay Company, and Etalon Diagnostics, for sponsoring the Future Event Horse Program.

Jan 27, 2022 Advertise

USEA Media Kit and USEA Sponsorship Packet now Available for 2022!

Interested in tapping into the audience of three-day eventing? Consider partnering with the United States Eventing Association (USEA) in 2022! The USEA is a non-profit 501 C (3), which serves as the national association for the Olympic equestrian sport of three-day eventing.

Jan 26, 2022 Instructors

Position, Balance, and Aids: Three Core Topics Covered in the USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels

Whether you are a rider preparing for a move-up or a trainer looking to ensure your training program is well-rounded, the soon-to-be released USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels is the go-to guide to assist you in navigating key decisions. Lucky enough, attendees of the 2022 USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) Symposium at Barnstaple South Farm in Ocala, Florida on February 8-9 will be the first people outside of the those involved in its creation to access this passion project that the ICP Committee has put two years of research and hard work into developing.

Jan 25, 2022 Volunteers

2021 USEA Volunteer of the Year: Cynthia Smith and Her Record-Breaking Year

In 2021 Cynthia Smith recorded 536 hours and 59 minutes of volunteer time, setting the standard with the most amount of volunteer hours recorded in a single year since the creation of the USEA Volunteer Incentive Program in 2016. The record-breaking number of volunteer time earned Smith the 2021 USEA Volunteer of the Year title.

Jan 24, 2022 Leaderboard

The USEA Lady Rider of 2021 is Leading the Charge in Elevating Eventing Competition on the West Coast

Tamie Smith’s year has been nothing short of action-packed as she packed up all 25 of her competition horses and made her way to the East Coast for the first part of the year before hopping on a jet to Tokyo where she served as the U.S. team reserve for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. She then stayed overseas and competed abroad for a little while before returning home to the West Coast. While this year has been full of opportunities to show, her aspirations are bigger than just competition. The 2021 Bates USEA Lady Rider of the Year has been full steam ahead chasing goals in both her riding career as well as in her impact on the sport’s future.

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