Jan 08, 2022

Top Takeaways from the ICP Open Forum

By Leslie Mintz - USEA Staff
The panel from the ICP Open Forum at Convention. USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

The mission of the USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) is to produce and improve the craft and art in the teaching of riding and horse management for the sport of eventing through the application of the highest principles of horsemanship, which ensures the ethical and humane treatment of horses and the safety of both horses and riders and extends to all those associated with the health and well-being of the horses.

ICP Committee members Mary D’Arcy, Phyllis Dawson, Robin Walker, Jennifer Rousseau, David O’Connor, and Karen O’Connor led the open forum at the 2021 USEA Annual Meeting & Convention sharing the many projects and changes in the ICP pipeline.

Watch the ICP Open Forum or read the top takeaways below:

All USEA members and eventing enthusiasts are invited to the ICP Symposium at Barnstaple South in Ocala, Florida on February 8-9, 2022. The ICP Symposium will include instruction of dressage, show jumping, and cross-country as well as the basics of sports psychology, and teaching to all four learning modalities. There will also be interactive portions with instructors breaking into small groups to analyze and suggest how horses and riders should move forward. The symposium will be led by ICP Faculty members, as well as Dr. Paul Haefner, PHD-Sports Psychologist. Learn more and how to register here.

The ICP Program wrote a USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels. The writing of this handbook has been two years in the making and the process was led by Subcommittee Chair Jennifer Howlett Rousseau. “It was a lot of imagination and innovation. In the end, all roads lead to rider safety,” she said. The handbook was inspired by Dan Michael’s proposal of a “skills matrix” and then was carefully crafted over two years and has gone through the approval of nearly all the USEA Committees before the Board’s approval. The handbook will debut at the ICP Symposium.

There will also be changes to the ICP certification levels to align with the FEI Levels. Level II instructors will move to Level III, Level III instructors will move to Level IV, and Level IV instructors will move to Level V. Moving forward, those instructors who are certified at Level I-Training will be required to submit a list of students they are currently teaching, and a review of the competition records of their students will be conducted. Those who are certified at Level I-Training will have the option to test up to Level II at a reduced rate, by December 31, 2024. After that date, if they have not tested up, they will automatically change to the certification level based on their current student’s competition levels.

The provisional ICP certification will be eliminated. In 2007, the ICP Committee instituted provisional certification to bring ICP certification to a wider range of instructors who may live in areas that do not have a big eventing presence, however, the instructor had the skills and eye to pass assessment but did not have students competing at the level at which they were seeking certification at the time they were assessed. Recently graduated equine studies students, who were building their business and did not have students, were also likely candidates. provisional certification was never meant to be a permanent certification. Moving forward, provisionally certified Instructors will be required to submit a list of students they are currently teaching, and a review of the competition records of their students will be conducted. All provisionally certified instructors will be given the option to move from provisional to regular certification by December 31, 2023. If they do not fulfill the regular certification requirements by that date, they will be moved to a certification level based on their student’s competition levels.

About the USEA Instructors’ Certification Program

Instructors are essential to the training of riders and horses for safe and educated participation in the sport of eventing. The USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) was initiated in 2002 to educate all levels of eventing instructor with essential training principles upon which those instructors can continue to build throughout their teaching careers. ICP offers educational workshops and assessments by which both regular instructors, Level I through Level IV, Young Event Horse (YEH) instructors, and Young Event Horse professional horse trainers can become ICP certified. Additional information about ICP’s goals, benefits, workshops, and assessments as well as names and contact information for current ICP-certified instructors, YEH instructors, and YEH professional horse trainers are available is available on the USEA website. Click here to learn more about the Instructors’ Certification Program.

The USEA would like to thank Parker Equine Insurance and Stable Secretary for sponsoring the Instructors’ Certification Program.

Jan 24, 2022 Leaderboard

The USEA Lady Rider of 2021 is Leading the Charge in Elevating Eventing Competition on the West Coast

Tamie Smith’s year has been nothing short of action-packed as she packed up all 25 of her competition horses and made her way to the East Coast for the first part of the year before hopping on a jet to Tokyo where she served as the U.S. team reserve for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. She then stayed overseas and competed abroad for a little while before returning home to the West Coast. While this year has been full of opportunities to show, her aspirations are bigger than just competition. The 2021 Bates USEA Lady Rider of the Year has been full steam ahead chasing goals in both her riding career as well as in her impact on the sport’s future.

Jan 23, 2022 Area Resources

Meet the USEA Areas: Area I

Get to know each United States Eventing Association (USEA) Areas a little better in this new series, Meet the Areas! This month’s feature is USEA Area I which is comprised of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Founded in the 1960s, Area I was the birthplace of the United States Combined Training Association (USCTA) which was founded in 1959 and would later evolve into the USEA in 2001. In 2021 just under 800 members made up the membership count in Area I.

Jan 22, 2022 Instructors

A Treasure Trove of Information: Get Another Sneak Peek at the USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels

Trainers, riders, parents, and more are in for a real treat when the all-new USEA Eventing Handbook by the Levels is officially released. Those participating in the 2022 USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) Symposium at Barnstaple South Farm in Ocala, Florida on February 8-9 will be the first to set eyes on this all-encompassing guide that has been two years in the making.

Jan 21, 2022 Young Event Horse

Get Your Young Event Horses Ready: 2022 YEH Calendar and YEH Rule Change Updates Announced

The USEA established the Young Event Horse (YEH) program in 2004 to identify young horses that possess the talent and disposition to, with proper training, excel at the uppermost levels of the sport. While the goal of the YEH program is to identify horses that will be successful at the four- and five-star levels, horses with the potential for lower-level success are also showcased by the program.

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