May 27, 2019

The Spring Event at Woodside Wraps Up

By Woodside Horse Trials - Edited Press Release
Sara Sellmer and PDQ Leigh. Kim Miller and Sherry Stewart Photos.

Winning an Advanced division anytime is a big deal. It was even bigger for Canadian professional Sara Sellmer, who did so at the Spring Event at Woodside aboard Jill Walton’s PDQ Leigh. In 2016 at the same venue, Sara’s horse, TF Kreisler, died following an incident on the CCI3* course and Sara hadn’t been back since.

“I wasn’t sure how I would handle it,” the rider acknowledged. “To be doing Advanced again and to win today is amazing. The support of the community here has also been amazing. All weekend I’ve been getting pats on the back in the warm-up ring and everybody telling me that I can do it.”

Sellmer has had the ride on PDQ Leigh just under a year and describes him as an especially “kind, generous and honest” horse. The pair started the weekend on a 33.80 dressage score from judges Valerie Crail and David Schmutz. On Saturday, they were one of just two pairs, out of 11, to go double clear on cross-country, putting them in Sunday’s catbird seat. They had a rail in hand and needed it. “It was totally mine,” said Sellmer of the downed pole in the triple element on a Chris Barnard track that used every inch of the Horse Park at Woodside’s big Grand Prix arena.

The win seals their qualification for the Rebecca Farm CCI4*-L in July, the next stop for the rider who is based in Langley, British Columbia.

Lauren Billys and Castle Larchfield Purdy. Kim Miller Photo.

Lauren Billys and her 2016 Olympic partner Castle Larchfield Purdy continued their return to West Coast prominence, finishing second after their 35.50 dressage score started them tied for fifth. Conscious of Purdy’s 17 years and with the Tokyo Games in her sights, Billys did not put pedal to metal on cross-country, so penalties there moved them down to sixth. An exuberant clear jumping round with only .40 over the time moved them into second. Billys is thrilled with Purdy’s fitness and finishing so well was “icing on the cake,” she said. Next up is Rebecca Farm, where she hopes to earn an Olympic-worthy score.

Frankie Thieriot Stutes and Chatwin. Kim Miller Photo.

Frankie Thieriot Stutes and Chatwin led after dressage with a 27.30, but took their time Saturday morning to sit fifth coming into the Grand Prix arena. They jumped clear with a .8 time fault, to leave Woodside with a yellow rosette and great prep for Luhmühlen Germany in June.

Fans of James Alliston’s popular palomino-colored mare, Pandora, were disappointed not to see her contend show jumping. She and James were second after cross-country, but James withdrew her after “being a bit banged up yesterday.” It was nothing serious, he assured. “She just seemed a little bit stiff last night.”

Advanced prize money was $500, $375, $300, $225 and $100, respectively, for first through fifth. As the winner, Sellmer also earned a Western Saddlery halter, certificates from Ride On Video, Marcus Green Photography and Devoucoux, plus gear and goodies from Professional’s Choice, Hilton Herbs, SmartPak, and Smartlyte, which also provided prizes to second and third place finishers.

Intermediate

James Alliston and Cassio's Picasso. Sherry Stewart Photo.

James Alliston’s other colorful star, Cassio’s Picasso KD, was in fine form Sunday to win the Intermediate division, the 7-year-old’s second run at this level. The Paint Trakehner’s characteristic elegance in dressage earned the stallion a 22.20, and a confidence-building pace on cross-country added time penalties to put them in second coming into show jumping, where they were easily fault-free.

Jordan Crabo and Over Easy. Sherry Stewart Photo.

Pouring rain arrived about halfway throughout the 21-pair Intermediate field at the end of a weekend otherwise graced by mostly sunny skies and cool weather. The day-two leader, 15-year-old Jordan Crabo, could have blamed a first fence refusal on the downpour, but she didn’t. Riding the seasoned upper lever campaigner, Over Easy, Crabo blamed herself. The mare is a reliable, yet tricky ride, she explained. “I have to really be kicking but also leaning back and give her just the right approach to the jump.” Rather than get rattled, however, the NAYC-bound Area X rider piloted the mare onto their first clear jumping round at the Intermediate level. Their previous two Intermediate outings, they’d had two rails, so Crabo was pleased about the round.

Crabo’s 25 dressage score put them in third on Friday, then they flew fault-free around a cross-country track she described as “so much fun.” Many pairs had time faults, but Over Easy’s efficiency and agility enabled them to make the time easily.

Kelsey Holmes and NZB The Chosen One. Kim Miller Photo.

Kelsey Holmes and NZB The Chosen One also jumped in the deluge, but keep their cool and their third-place position, finishing on Friday’s 30.30 dressage score.

Intermediate top finishers earned $300, $225, $180, $135 and $60, respectively, for first through fifth, plus several items from much-appreciated Spring Event sponsors.

A Sold-Out Weekend

Sunday concluded three days of competition ranging from Intro to Advanced and featuring Saturday’s special event, the Preliminary Challenge. Now in its 11th year, the Challenge drew a record number at nearly 50 participants, all vying for $30,000 in total cash and prizes divided equally between the Rider and Horse divisions. The Challenge concluded with show jumping Saturday night in the Grand Prix arena in front of a full house and in an electric atmosphere. On the rider card, Meg Pellegrini took top honors aboard her veteran star, Ganymede, and finished third with her new horse, RF Eloquence. The Horse division was won by Penhill Celtic, piloted by professional Bec Braitling.

Organizer Robert Kellerhouse was very happy with the weekend. “Even the things we can’t control – like the weather – went well,” he said. All tolled, 450 horses/rider pairs enjoyed a sold-out weekend of competition, furthering The Spring Event’s reputation for top sport in a beautiful environment.

Upgrades to stabling, cross-country, infrastructure and in other areas were appreciated by all from visiting dignitaries, like US Eventing CEO Rob Burk, to first-time exhibitors. Saturday night’s Preliminary Challenge Dinner Gala crowd was treated to a down-to-the-wire finish and a new cross-country VIP viewing tent was well received. As always, volunteers – about 125 through the weekend – made the Event work, and sponsors were equally critical to its success.

Feb 16, 2020 Education

Grid Pro Quo with Alyssa Peterson

From the time we begin jumping, we are always working on perfecting the canter. Throughout my career I’ve been lucky to train with a variety of top professionals and each had their tried and true method for developing the right canter to jump a clear round. The best instructors have their own methods for helping their students recognize this “perfect” canter.

Feb 15, 2020 Profile

Now On Course: Cindy Rawson Returns from Across the Pond

In 1984, 19-year-old Cindy Rawson (née Collier) and a chestnut mare named Deer Creek finished their first CCI4* at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. In spite of a fall on the cross-country, they completed inside the time and with a clear show- jumping round finished the event in 13th place.

Feb 14, 2020 Education

Featured Clinician: Martin Douzant

For Martin Douzant, experience is everything. As the owner and operator of The Frame Sport Horses based in The Plains, Virginia, Douzant has been able to build a successful training business on a foundation of great education, involvement across equestrian disciplines, and a distinct reverence for the horse.

Feb 13, 2020 Volunteers

New Addition to VIP: The Volunteer Medal Program

The USEA Volunteer Committee is pleased to announce a new Volunteer Medal Program has been added to the USEA Volunteer Incentive Program presented by Sunsprite Warmbloods (VIP) starting this year. The Volunteer Medal Program will recognize the volunteers who consistently volunteer year after year.

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