May 09, 2021

In Memoriam: Antigua (1989-2021)

By Leslie Mintz - USEA Staff
Will Faudree and Antigua. USEA Archives Photo.

Will Faudree shared the news yesterday that his legendary event horse, Antigua, passed away at the age of 32. In a Facebook post he said:

“I always thought I would have something profound to write. A eulogy that would encapsulate the impact you had on my life. And maybe those words will come. You taught me what a work ethic is, how to think in slow motion and how to just keep going. You laid the foundation for a career I dreamed of as a kid. Thank you will never be enough. I will miss you every day- rest easy my friend.”

Antigua was a Thoroughbred bred in Australia by Match Winner and out of Great Mistake. He was found in Australia by Phillip Dutton who Will Faudree worked for as a young rider and “Brad” was imported and began a partnership with Faudree. Together with Faudree he earned 957 lifetime points and currently sits in 13th on the all-time USEA historical leaderboard. In their many years of partnership, their cross-country record was spotless and had over 25 top-five places.

USEA Archives Photo.

Highlights of Faudree and Antigua’s career include a fourth place at the 2002 Fair Hill CCI3* (now CCI4*-L), 12th place at the 2003 Kentucky Three-Day Event, 10th at the 2004 Kentucky Three-Day Event (Modified), 22nd at the 2005 Badminton Horse Trials, second at the 2005 Fair Hill CCI3* (now CCI4*-L), and 21st at the 2007 Burghley Horse Trials.

They represented the U.S. at both the Pan American Games in 2003 where they finished individually in sixth place and were members of the gold-medal-winning U.S. Team and at the 2006 World Equestrian Games where they earned a top-20 spot.

Will Faudree and Antigua (far left) at the 2003 Pan American Games. USEA Archives Photo.

“I got Brad in my last year as a young rider; he took me to my first three-star, my first four-star, my first team, my first Worlds, and my first European trip,” said Faudree in an article in 2009. “Brad is that horse that made me. His work ethic, his passion for his career, is incomparable to any horse I’ve sat on since. I’ll have horses in my career who are better than him in some ways, but Antigua can never be replaced.”

Antigua officially retired at the age of 20 during a ceremony at the 2009 Southern Pines Horse Trials.

The USEA sends its sincerest condolences to Faudree and all of Antigua’s connections.

Jun 19, 2021 Editorial

Crossing Oceans with U.S. Olympian Tiana Coudray

Plenty of event riders have chosen to cross oceans and base themselves thousands of miles away from “home” in pursuit of their career dreams - look at the likes of New Zealanders Sir Mark Todd and Andrew Nicholson, and now Tim and Jonelle Price, while Andrew Hoy, Clayton Fredericks and of course Boyd Martin and Phillip Dutton have set sail from Australian shores. Not many American riders do it, though, probably because the sport is big enough and competitive enough in the U.S. not to make it necessary.

Jun 18, 2021

Weekend Quick Links: June 18-20, 2021

Are you following along with the action from home this weekend? Or maybe you're competing at an event and need information fast. Either way, we’ve got you covered! Check out the USEA’s Weekend Quick Links for links to information including the prize list, ride times, live scores, and more for all the events running this weekend.

Jun 18, 2021 Grants

Ever So Sweet Scholarship Recipient Announced: Inaugural Scholarship Awarded to Helen Casteel

Strides for Equality Equestrians and the United States Eventing Association Foundation are proud to announce the first recipient of the Ever So Sweet Scholarship. The scholarship, which is the first of its kind, provides a fully-funded opportunity for riders from diverse backgrounds to train with upper-level professionals. Helen Casteel of Maryland is the first recipient of the bi-annual scholarship.

Jun 18, 2021 Association News

USEA Office Closed in Observance of Juneteenth

Tomorrow is Juneteenth, which marks the day in 1865 when the federal order was read in Galveston, Texas stating that all enslaved people in Texas were free. This federal order was critical because it represented the emancipation of the last remaining enslaved African Americans in the Confederate States. Although Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation had formally freed all people enslaved in the Confederacy almost two and a half years earlier, Union enforcement of the proclamation had been slow and inconsistent, especially in Texas. Slavery would continue in two states that had remained in the Union— Kentucky and Delaware — until the ratification of the 13th Amendment in December 1865.

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