Feb 17, 2020

Andreas Dibowski’s Words of Wisdom From Day 1 of the 2020 ICP Symposium

By Leslie Mintz - USEA Staff
USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

The USEA Educational Symposium is a unique opportunity each winter for eventers to gather together to soak in knowledge. The first two days of the 2020 Symposium focus on the USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) with attendees learning how to be better, more effective instructors.

German Olympian and world-renowned rider Andreas Dibowski is this year’s guest instructor and he spent the first day dedicated to dressage with one Advanced show jumping group to wrap-up the day. Dibowski taught the instructors to teach using demo riders and horses from Beginner Novice to Advanced of all ages, breeds, and sizes.

On going forward and straight:

“Straightness and forward riding is the basis for everything.”

“We have to explain the difference between riding forward and riding fast. That’s the first step to learn and feel. Listen to the forward riding aids from the legs. A horse will start to go through as the result of the good forward riding.”

“Your life purpose is to train your horse to be straight. One side is always going to be easy and one is going to be hard. It is important for the rider to maintain the perfect position to even begin working on straightness.”

“It is very difficult to ride straight and forward on the long side. It is easier to ride on the bend or a circle.”

“Straight correct counter canter is the basis for the correct flying change.”

“Collection means not slow, but more power.”

“Flexion is just the point behind the ears – not the full neck.”

On the half halt:

“Use your upper body to bring weight on the horse and keep your leg on. Don’t just use your rein. Do it throughout your entire circle. Work with all aids together. Even using voice. It’s a connection – it has to come back from the hind leg. Like taking a deep breath. The half halt is very easy to explain but very difficult to do in the practice.”

USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

On accuracy:

“It’s not an egg. It’s a circle.”

“Don’t let your horse run away from the line [of the circle]. It’s your job to keep him on the line. If you open the door then he will use it. Close the door and show him the way. He’s happy when you tell him what to do.”

“I like seeing the rider soft, but sometimes you need to be more strict. If you have a plan make sure the horse understands it.”

“Before every corner bring him back with your body, but ride him through with your leg.”

On listening to your horse:

“The hollow side is the one the has to work more. A horse tires faster on the stiff side. Your students need to listen to the horse. It may be not good to push through. Horses will show you.”

“You can’t force anything. You have to bring the horse back to happiness. You need to see the whole package.”

“It is important that the horse has to learn to go forward. The horse is too backward. We have to look if the horse is having fun. The horse has to open his body and go forward and feel the fun again.”

“It’s not always the same. The horses make the plan.”

On finding the contact:

“You need to be able to ride your horse with a longer rein – don’t look for connection on a short rein.”

“Contact on a longer outside rein gives better control on the inside hind leg. Keep your hands together so the horse finds the stability for he needs for work.”

“Bring the shoulder in. Not bring the hind leg out. Stay on the circle and give a good feeling for the rhythm. Start to bring up your contact from your forwarding riding aids.”

“Don’t let your rein jump with a soft contact – that’s actually punishing your horse. Never give up the connection from your leg, your hand, and your own body.”

USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.

On the rider’s position:

“When I say shorten you rein don’t go forward with your body. Push down with your body. Hands Together.”

Don’t bend your head – bend the horse’s head.”

“You can’t just focus on your horse. You need to work on your position.”

“Upper body back is support for the forward riding.”

“Don’t move your leg away during the transition.”

Dibowski’s Rules For The Day

Never rise the trot on the wrong leg. “Rising trot on the wrong leg gives the impulsion to the wrong leg.”

“The break starts after a good transition.”

“Dressage is hard work. It’s not fun.”

“Smile more”

“Breathe, stay relaxed and never forget you love the riding.”

“When you are in the arena you need to work.”

“Don’t stick to the textbook too much. You need to react to the situation.”

“Always the same with the young riders. They need more discipline.”

“Feel the rhythm.”

The 2020 USEA Educational Symposium is taking place from February 17-20 at Barnstaple South in Ocala, Florida. On-site registration is available. Learn more here.

USEA/Leslie Mintz Photo.


About the USEA Instructors’ Certification Program

Instructors are essential to the training of riders and horses for safe and educated participation in the sport of eventing. The USEA Instructors’ Certification Program (ICP) was initiated in 2002 to educate all levels of eventing instructor with essential training principles upon which those instructors can continue to build throughout their teaching careers. ICP offers educational workshops and assessments by which both regular instructors, Level I through Level IV, Young Event Horse (YEH) instructors, and Young Event Horse professional horse trainers can become ICP certified. Additional information about ICP’s goals, benefits, workshops, and assessments as well as names and contact information for current ICP-certified instructors, YEH instructors, and YEH professional horse trainers are available is available on the USEA website. Click here to learn more about the Instructors’ Certification Program.

The USEA would like to thank EquiAppraisal and C4 Belts for sponsoring the Instructors’ Certification Program.

May 12, 2021 Competitions

Maryland 5 Star at Fair Hill Announces $300,000 Prize Money for Inaugural Event

The Fair Hill Organizing Committee (FHOC), an affiliate of the Sport and Entertainment Corporation of Maryland (The Sport Corp.), today announced athletes and horses in the inaugural Maryland 5 Star at Fair Hill (CCI5*-L) will be competing for $300,000 in prize money. Additionally, the US Equestrian Federation (USEF) Eventing National Championship (CCI3*-L), running in conjunction with the 5 Star, will award $25,000 in prize money. Both events, as well as the United States Eventing Association (USEA) Young Event Horse East Coast Championships, will take place this October 14-17 at the new Fair Hill Special Event Zone in Cecil County, Maryland.

May 12, 2021 Education

Pre-Purchase Examination 101: With Dr. Shauna Spurlock

You’ve seen a horse you like. You’ve ridden it; you love it. The money’s right; you’ve agreed to buy it. What happens next?

Pre-purchase veterinary examinations are one of those topics that a roomful of horsey people could discuss - and argue amongst themselves about - for hours. For the amateur rider, that can be confusing and slightly alarming.

So, let’s simplify it. What is a pre-purchase examination, why are they done, and what should you expect?

May 11, 2021 Intercollegiate

Eyes on the Prize at the USEA Intercollegiate Eventing Championships

The USEA Intercollegiate Eventing Championships will take place later this month at the Virginia Horse Trials (VHT) in Lexington, Va. across May 27-30. Following the USEF COVID-19 Action Plan, the USEA is working with VHT organizer Andy Bowles to ensure the Championships are still a destination competition for all Intercollegiate event riders, packed full with an opening ceremony, the traditional “college town” area, the prestigious spirit award, and an abundance of prizes.

May 10, 2021 Eventing News

2021 FEI MER Changes effective July 1

The FEI passed rule changes impacting Minimum Eligibility Requirements in November 2020 that go into effect on July 1, 2021. The changes will impact athletes who are uncategorized, “D” and “C” athletes competing at the CCI4*-S, CCI3*-L, CCI4*-L, and CCI5*-L levels. Please see below for the highlighted changes. The USEF requirements to compete at these levels remain unchanged, but please remember that the USEF requirements must be achieved within 12 months of the competition. These changes will be adopted into the USEF Eventing Rulebook by July 1. See Appendix 3 for qualification requirements.

Official Corporate Sponsors of the USEA

Official Outerwear of the USEA

Official Supplement Feeding System of the USEA

Official Forage of the USEA

Official Feed of the USEA

Official Saddle of the USEA

Official Joint Therapy Treatment of the USEA

Official Equine Insurance of the USEA

Official Horse Clothing of the USEA