Mar 08, 2018

USEA Events A-Z: Feather Creek Farm Horse Trials

By Dynah Korhummel - Feather Creek Farm
John's Decoy" - one of 83 jumps built by John Staples for Feather Creek Farm's first USEA recognized event. Suzy Brown/Equine Originals Photo courtesy of Feather Creek Farm.

Feather Creek Farm in Norman, Oklahoma (Area V) hosts two USEA recognized events in June and September, offering Introductory through Preliminary levels. At their June event they also host divisions for the Future Event Horse and Young Event Horse. Feather Creek Farm offers boarding and training services all year as well as cross-country schooling, combined tests, and unrecognized events.

Feather was the name I gave my rambunctious white kitten whose only spot of color was her grey tail. Unfortunately, Feather was born with a heart murmur and other internal defects. Barely weighing three pounds, she survived 18 months but never lost her persevering and courageous personality. Feather had more spirit than anyone I’ve ever met. I figured it would take just about all her traits to acquire and restore the 100-acre farm I purchased in 2008, so I named the farm Feather Creek Farm after my ferocious little tiger.

I’m a native of Montreal and have been riding since age five and eventing since age 12. I studied economics, then spent 13 years in California, both competing in horse trials up to the Advanced level and launching a veterinary division for a Berkeley sports medicine company. It was an eight-day-a-week job, with a lot of travel, and I dreamed of settling down on a small property with a cross-country course in my backyard. Little did I know what I was getting myself into! During a Quarter Horse Congress, a friend told me of Tipasa, a 100-acre farm situated seven miles northeast of Norman, Oklahoma that Judy and Mike Huber had built from scratch 30 years ago.

Photo courtesy of the Feather Creek Farm Facebook page.

Under a subsequent owner, though, the property had been neglected. It was overgrown with trees and bushes and the jumps had deteriorated. The minute I stepped onto the property, I knew it was for me, and it became a mission to restore the farm. It took three years of negotiations with the owner, and in January 2008, the sale was closed.

Then the work started to get Feather Creek Farm ready to host its first USEA recognized horse trials. It began with a lot of brush clearing and land preparation. I phoned John Staples of Windermere Stables, a veteran eventer and USEA Level III instructor from Wichita, Kansas, to design our cross-country course.

Photo courtesy of the Feather Creek Farm Facebook page.

John doesn’t always answer his phone, but he did on this occasion. I always joked with him that he was probably sorry he picked up that day because of all the work that we needed to get done! When the USEA approved our first date of August 29-30, 2009, the clock started ticking. With just 33 days before the event, John built 83 fences from Starter through Preliminary level.

About 10 days out from the start of the event I started peeping my head around the corner of the work barn, asking where we were with respect to the number of jumps we needed to finish. After a couple days of this, John looked up and said, “Stop! We’ll make it!” I obviously didn’t do that again!

One of the best fences was the duck fence down at the pond. John carved the duck head and it definitely became a signature fence. The last two jumps were completed on the morning of August 29. Sheila Strickler and Ana Schravesande served as the President of the Ground Jury and Technical Delegate and as soon as they arrived they helped finish numbering and flagging the jumps. I was lucky to have those two as the officials for my first event! Needless to say, our first horse trials at Feather Creek went off like a charm, thanks to everyone’s incredibly hard work.

Photo courtesy of the Feather Creek Farm Facebook page.

Adri Doyal has been working on the course for the last few years, and with her expertise and creativity for cross-country the course continues to be a big galloping ride, with some extraordinary fences, big bold questions, and friendly profiles.

Nearly 10 years later, I’m still running Feather Creek Horse Trials and next year I will host my 20th event. It’s been an incredible experience, some good, some bad, but it’s all about perseverance. This sport is all about that. Never give up and always keep kicking!

Perseverance is a cardinal rule, and I found it again when I first bought the farm in a little mixed-terrier puppy of limitless personality that adopted me and refused to take no for an answer. I decided I needed another mascot, and of course I had to name the puppy Feather.

The USEA is profiling the history behind all USEA recognized events in the USEA Events A­-Z series.

Sep 22, 2020 Profile

Now On Course: Jennarose Ortmeyer Shoots for the Stars

My road to success is a bit different and quite a bit longer than most. Hi, my name is Jennarose Ortmeyer. I am 24 years old and my eventing journey started three years ago in the summer of 2017. Originally from Saint Louis, Missouri, I moved to North Carolina in June of 2017 seeking to further my career. I was a professional in the hunter/jumper world then and I hadn’t the faintest idea of how drastically my life was about to change.

Sep 21, 2020 Education

How Strong is Your Training Game?

How competitive have your Training results been? What’s a good dressage score? What scores could earn you a top finish? We’ve been taking a look at each USEA level and as we continue this series, EquiRatings offers some stats and graphs to help evaluate your Training game.

Sep 20, 2020 Competitions

Smith Wins CCI4*-S, CCI3*-S; Turner Takes CCI2*-S at Twin Rivers Fall International

The CCI4*-S had an exciting shake-up of the top placings to finish out the International divisions at the Twin Rivers Fall International. It was Tamie Smith and Passepartout, an 11-year-old German Sport Horse gelding (Pasco x Preschel) owned by Tamie's daughter Kaylawna Smith-Cook, who came out on top with the fastest cross-country time of the group. Ruth Bley’s 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding Danito (Dancier x Wie Musik) took second. Erin Kellerhouse and her own Woodford Reserve rounded out the top three.

Sep 20, 2020 Education

Foregut or Hindgut? That's The Question!

Knowing what sort of support your horse needs can be tough, but it can also make a big difference. There’s a lot of confusion between your horse’s foregut health and hindgut health. After all, the process of breaking down food and absorbing nutrients is all technically “digestion,” so isn’t it all the same? Not quite. The organs in the foregut and hindgut have different functions, and each area has unique health concerns.

Official Corporate Sponsors of the USEA

Official Outerwear of the USEA

Official Supplement Feeding System of the USEA

Official Forage of the USEA

Official Feed of the USEA

Official Saddle of the USEA

Official Joint Therapy Treatment of the USEA

Official Equine Insurance of the USEA