Jun 09, 2019

Connemaras Crowned Champions in Area III

Claire Robinson and *Doonhill Dancer. Photo courtesy of Rider.

For the first time in a number of years, the USEA Area III Championships returned to Poplar Place Farm in Hamilton, Georgia, taking place on the first weekend in June. Competitors from all over the Southeast sighed with relief when unseasonably hot weather broke, and the days were met with little humidity and a refreshing breeze!

More than 200 horses competed across 24 horse trials and championship divisions, but a particular breed stood out from the rest last weekend. They may have been far outnumbered by Thoroughbreds, Warmbloods, and Irish Sport Horses, but it was the Connemara ponies who really shone! Seven purebred and half-bred Connemaras, all registered with the American Connemara Pony Society, competed over the weekend, and all seven came home in the ribbons! Four of them won their divisions, and three of those four were competing in a Championship division.

Poppyfield’s Tiger Shark, a 17-year-old half-bred Connemara gelding by Seven Hill’s Grey Ghost and out of a Thoroughbred mare, competed in the Junior Novice Rider Championship Division. He was bred in the USA by Kim Gates, and was ridden by Marissa Griffin. He finished fourth on his dressage score of 32.6

The 5-year-old purebred stallion, *Doonhill Dancer, by Curachmore Cashel and out of April Dawn Lady, won his Novice Horse Championship Division on his dressage score of 32.4 with Claire Robinson in the tack. Dancer was bred by Damien and Mary Gorham of Ireland and imported as a foal by his current owners, Mike and Jennifer Keane.

Carla Jimmerson’s homebred, Valley Creek Carlin LeBeau, a 14-year-old purebred Connemara gelding by Heaven’s Ridge Patrick LeBeau and out Beacon’s Cherubin Cathleen, finished on a 36.6 for fifth place in the Novice Rider Division. Jimmerson bred, raised and trained Carlin herself and has been eventing him for a number of years.

Megan Harris and TBS Declan Pondi. Vada Cunningham Photo.

Another young Connemara stallion, the 7-year-old, *TBS Declan Pondi, by Dexter Leam Pondi and out of Dandy Sparrow, led the Senior Novice Rider Championship Division from start to finish on his dressage score of 25.6. Declan is trained and ridden by Megan Harris and is owned by her mother, Nancy Buchanan. They picked Declan out in Ireland as a 3-month-old foal, purchasing him from his breeder, Carol Henley, and importing him as a weanling.

Big Bear’s Cepheus, a 5-year-old half-bred gelding by the Holsteiner stallion, Cor de Lux, and out of the purebred Connemara mare, Big Bear’s Esther, won his Beginner Novice Horse Championship Division on a score of 26.5, only adding one rail to his remarkable dressage score of 22.5! Peter, as he is known around the barn, was bred by Leigh Ellen Ertle of Big Bear Connemaras in Pine Mountain, Ga., and is now owned by the Geven Family. He was capably ridden by Lily Barlow.

Tessa Geven and Tullymor's Houdini. Photo courtesy of Rider.

The diminutive Tullymor’s Houdini (Samson), a purebred gelding by Fieldstream Riley and out of Kahlua, was bred in Georgia by May Medley. Samson, now 16 years old, joined the Gevens four years ago, and only began his undersaddle career at the age of 12! He finished third in the Junior Beginner Novice Rider Champion Division with Tessa Geven on a 30.8. Learn more about Samson's story here.

Last but not least, Cady O’Daly Endymion, a flashy 13-year-old palomino half-bred Connemara gelding by Tre Awain Goldsmith and out of a Thoroughbred mare, won his Open Beginner Novice Division with his owner/rider, Chrissy West. Minion as he is known, actually has some pretty famous siblings - two of his half-brothers, Cady O’Daly Michael and Cady O’Daly Gabrielle, have won divisions at the USEA American Eventing Championships. The Cady O’Daly prefix is linked to Alicia and Emily Daily, Connemara breeders in Virginia.

Lily Barlow and Big Bear's Cepheus. Photo Courtesy of Rider.

About the Connemara Pony

The Connemara Pony is Ireland’s only native breed, a sturdy, sound-minded, and versatile individual that was developed out of necessity for an animal that could serve many purposes for their Irish family. The breed’s history is rooted in service, from pulling the family’s cart to church on Sunday, to plowing fields, to racing, and showing.

Over the last century, with the formation of the Connemara Pony Breeders Society in 1923, and with the modernization of travel and farming, the Connemara Pony’s purpose has shifted away from farm work and transportation towards showing and performance. Thanks to the creation of breed societies all over the world, and the development of the International Committee of Connemara Pony Societies, the breed’s natural characteristics have been preserved and developed into a breed standard.

The Connemara Pony’s sound limbs, stamina, and naturally intelligent and willing nature make it an ideal partner for riding and showing. They are remarkably good jumpers and possess that ‘fifth leg’ that keep them and their rider safe and upright, even in trappy or precarious conditions. The ponies are well respected all across Europe for their performance ability, and it is not uncommon to see them winning on the international stage in show jumping and eventing at European Championships.

Megan Harris and TBS Declan Pondi. Vada Cunningham Photo.

The American Connemara Pony Society, seeing the benefit of crossing the Connemara on larger horse breeds, particularly the Thoroughbred, has added registries for both half-bred Connemaras and Connemara Sport Horses (1/4 Connemara). The Connemara crosses are particularly well suited for eventing, especially combined with the speed & gallop of the Thoroughbred. Additionally, the crosses allow for a broader audience, the added height being more suitable for the taller rider.

While you may think of the Connemara Pony as a child’s or Adult Amateur mount, don’t be fooled! They can be fiercely competitive and many have easily risen up the levels. Allie Sacksen has successfully competed her half-bred gelding, Sparrow’s Nio, through the five-star level and Lila Gendal and her BT Just a Rebel, another half-bred gelding, have been very competitive at the three-star level this past year. While the half-breds may have the advantage as one climbs into the upper levels, it’s not unheard of to see purebreds competing at Preliminary and above. Undoubtedly the most famous pair were Hideaway’s Erin Go Bragh and Carol Kozlowski, but more recently ponies like Courtney Sendak’s Wil Ya’ Love Me (Advanced) and Donna Miller’s *ArdCeltic Art (three-star) have shared the limelight.

Dec 14, 2019 Convention

Year End Awards Presented at the 2019 USEA Annual Meeting & Convention

Every year the eventing community comes together to celebrate the hard work and accomplishments of its members at the United States Eventing Association (USEA) Annual Meeting & Convention Year End Awards Ceremony. Led by Master of Ceremonies Jim Wofford, the awards ceremony is one of the most anticipated events of Convention and gives eventers the opportunity to celebrate their successes with their family and friends.

Dec 14, 2019 Education

VIDEO: Why Aren't U.S. Event Horses Lasting Longer

Over the previous decade, the number of upper level event horses that remain at the highest levels of the sport for extended periods of time has anecdotally been dwindling. Also, it is rare to see horses return to represent the U.S. on international teams. This discussion features statistics provided by the USEA and EquiRatings to strengthen our understanding of this issue and perspectives from coaches, trainers, riders, grooms, and veterinary professionals on the possible reasons and solutions.

Dec 14, 2019 Convention

Changing of the Guard at the USEA Annual Meeting of Members

For 60 years the members of the USEA have been coming together to discuss the business of the Association and make important decisions to keep the sport of eventing thriving in America. The USEA Annual Meeting & Convention has turned into four days full of meetings and more, but the Annual Meeting remains the backbone.

Dec 14, 2019 Education

VIDEO: Cultivating the Whole Equestrian

The focus of this presentation is mindfulness practice, how it ties into the core principles of mindset, fitness, nutrition, and community, and how these topics foster optimal performance in and out of the saddle. As equestrians, we invest a lot of time and energy making sure that our horses are in their best shape to compete and in doing so we often sweep our own needs to the side.

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