Support the USEA by Supporting Our Advertisers

Amber Heintzberger

Volunteering is a great way to be involved in horse sports, whether you are an active competitor who wants to give back or you are a horse enthusiast who just wants to be involved. Every competitor in eventing must ride a dressage test, and every dressage judge at a horse trials or three-day event is required to have a scribe to write down their comments and scores during each ride so that they can focus on the horse and rider in front of them. That means that there is a great need for volunteers who are capable of scribing.
Original Post Date: 03/12/2018 - 08:17   |   Last Updated: 2018:03:12 08:17:52

When Alexa Lapp started working for eventer Jennie Brannigan in 2012, the plan was to help out for a month or two until Brannigan found full-time help. Lapp traveled from her home in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania to Ocala, Florida in the winter of her Junior year of high school, having finished a substantial amount of school credit in her Freshman and Sophomore years and completing her schooling with a combination of on-campus and online courses. Six years later Lapp is still working for Brannigan and their partnership has opened up opportunities for the 19-year-old Young Rider.
Original Post Date: 03/09/2018 - 12:28   |   Last Updated: 2018:03:09 12:28:07

The USEA is made up of over 12,000 members, each with their own special horses and experiences. Now on Course highlights the many unique stories of our membership. Do you and your horse have a tale to tell? Do you know someone who deserves recognition? Submit your story to Jessica Duffy.
Original Post Date: 10/09/2017 - 15:30   |   Last Updated: 2017:10:09 15:30:30

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next we look at an Eventing Judge.
Original Post Date: 02/14/2017 - 08:32   |   Last Updated: 2017:02:15 16:45:04

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next up, Technical Delegate.
Original Post Date: 02/02/2017 - 08:39   |   Last Updated: 2017:02:02 08:39:31

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next up, Event Organizer and Secretary.
Original Post Date: 01/23/2017 - 14:51   |   Last Updated: 2017:01:26 13:13:49

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. First up, cross-country course designer.
Original Post Date: 01/11/2017 - 10:17   |   Last Updated: 2017:02:01 15:34:39

Qualifying for the American Eventing Championships is an achievement for anyone, but it’s particularly special when an entire family can do it together. For the Beshear family, three generations and four members of their family pulled off this feat and will be competing next weekend at the 2016 Nutrena USEA American Eventing Championships presented by Land Rover (AEC) at the Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC).
Original Post Date: 08/26/2016 - 12:26   |   Last Updated: 2016:08:26 13:08:20

Sinead Halpin was looking for a confidence-building weekend for herself and Manoir de Carneville before heading to Ireland for the Millstreet International Three-Day Event, and their solid performance earned them the win in the Adequan USEA Gold Cup Advanced Division at the Millbrook Horse Trials at Coole Park Farm in Millbrook, NY.
Original Post Date: 08/07/2016 - 19:00   |   Last Updated: 2016:08:07 19:44:08

Only seven out of 43 entries in the Adequan USEA Gold Cup Advanced Division at Millbrook Horse Trials had jumping faults on today’s cross-country phase, but the leaderboard looks very different than it did yesterday after dressage. One of only four combinations to go double clear, Sinead Halpin and Manoir de Carneville, a 16-year-old Selle Francais gelding, moved up from a tie for 3rd place to take the lead on their dressage score of 27.10. Overnight leader Kim Severson and Cooley Cross Border added 7.6 time faults to currently stand 5th.
Original Post Date: 08/06/2016 - 17:00   |   Last Updated: 2016:08:07 19:24:57

Pages

USEA Official Corporate Sponsors