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USEA News

February 14, 2017

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next we look at an Eventing Judge.

February 2, 2017

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next up, Technical Delegate.

January 31, 2017

Due to an event cancellation, the location of the USEF Licensed Officials Final Examination has been relocated to the Richland Park Horse Trials in Richland, Mich. August 24-27, 2017 and is open to all prospective “r”, “R”, “S” Eventing Judges, Technical Delegates, and Cross-Country Course Designers.

What: All Levels Final Examination

Who: Prospective “r”, “R”, “S” Eventing Judges, Technical Delegates, and Cross-Country Course Designers

Where: Richland Park Horse Trials, Richland, Mich.

When: August 24-27, 2017

January 23, 2017

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. Next up, Event Organizer and Secretary. Though these jobs require no license, they do require expert preparation, keen attention to detail and the ability to handle anything that comes their way.

January 11, 2017

Most eventers recognize a licensed official as their judge, technical delegate or cross-country course designer, but many haven’t considered how these officials found themselves in those roles. The path to becoming licensed is often long, undulating and expensive, and yet these individuals do it to keep the sport alive for years to come. In this series, we explore what exactly it takes to become a licensed official. First up, cross-country course designer.

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